There are fields of energy that shape our lives and they

come from the stories of our experiences.

The fields of energy that shape our lives come from the stories of our experiences.  Each cell is like a filing cabinet for what has happened to not just our personal life, but the lives of our ancestors.  The does not understand time or space like our perceptions do.  When we recall events in our lives,  things that may have happened to us as little children, our brain will produce the same chemical response to that memory as if it was happening in the present moment.  This is why it is critical to tell our stories and have them experienced in a thoughtful, supportive way.  It creates another sound or vibration, if you will to that event (good or bad).  Your experiences become richer..like adding color to your palette.Art allows for the evolution of consciousness.  We hope you join us and share a story or two (or just witness).  Allow us to honor you....we would be honored.

The Movement Shala: 435 E 9th St Tucson, AZ

Each cell is like a filing cabinet for what has happened, not just in our personal life, but the lives of our ancestors, families and friends. The brain does not understand time or space like our perceptions do. When we recall events in our lives, things that may have happened to us as little children, our brain will produce the same chemical response to that memory as if it was happening in the present moment. This is why it is critical to tell our stories and have them experienced in a thoughtful, supportive way. It creates another sound or vibration, if you will to that event (good or bad). Your experiences become richer..like adding color to your palette.

Art allows for the evolution of consciousness. We hope you join us and share a story or two (or just witness). Allow us to honor you….we would be honored.

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12 thoughts on “”

    1. This site explains it much more eloquently than I can….the site url is on the bottom of the page. Thanks for asking!

      Most chemicals found in the brain are neurotransmitters, chemicals used to relay, amplify, and modulate the electrical signals passed between neurons and other cells.

      The neurotransmitters found in the brain consist primarily of small-molecule transmitters (a class of about ten molecules), and more than fifty neuroactive peptides or proteins. Some fatty acids may also be neurotransmitters, as are several single ions like synaptically-released zinc.

      Though the chemicals in the brain vary, their effect is determined by the receptor they go to, not by the chemicals themselves.

      The small-molecule neurotransmitter molecules are generally packaged in vesicles, and their release is triggered by synaptic depolarization which causes calcium ion channels to open and release the neurotransmitter; the whole process is called exocytosis. Neurotransmitters released in this way diffuse across the synaptic divide to bind to receptors. Peptides are synthesized in the neuron’s soma and transmitted through the axon to the synaptic divide; otherwise, the mechanism of release is similar.

      Neurotransmitters are often removed from the synaptic divide by a process called reuptake or uptake; this clears the channel so that the neuron is no longer stimulated or inhibited. With acetylcholine and some other neurotransmitters, the mechanism is digestion by an enzyme instead, or dissolution by proteases. Most neuroactive drugs take advantage of these removal mechanisms to affect the brain.

      A list of common neurotransmitters:

      Derived from amino acids
      aspartate
      glutamate (Glu)
      γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)
      glycine (Gly)

      Biogenic amines
      acetylcholine (Ach)

      Monoamines (in order of synthesis)

      -from phenylalanine and tyrosine:
      dopamine (DA)
      norepinephrine or noradrenaline (NE)
      epinephrine or adrenaline (Epi)

      -from tryptophan:
      serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5HT)
      melatonin (Mel)

      -from histidine:
      histamine (H)

      Polypeptides (or neuropeptides)

      bombesin
      gastrin releasing peptide (GRP)

      Gastrins
      gastrin
      cholecystokinin (CCK)

      Neurohypophyseals
      vasopressin
      oxytocin
      neurophysin I
      neurophysin II

      Neuropeptide Y
      neuropeptide Y (NY)
      pancreatic polypeptide (PP)
      peptide YY (PYY)

      Opioids
      corticotropin (adrenocorticotropic hormone, ACTH)
      Beta-lipotropin
      dynorphin
      endorphin
      enkephaline
      leumorphin

      Secretins
      secretin
      motilin
      glucagon
      vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP)
      growth hormone-releasing factor (GRF)

      Somatostatins
      somatostatin

      Tachykinins
      neurokinin A
      neurokinin B
      neuropeptide A
      neuropeptide gamma
      substance P

      Other neurotransmitters
      nitric oxide (NO) no receptor
      carbon monoxide (CO)
      anandamide

      Besides neurotransmitting chemicals, many other chemicals found in the brain function as precursors or building blocks to neurotransmitters. Additionally, the cerebrospinal fluid of the brain which provides protection, nutrition and buoyancy to the brain is a clear fluid that contains traces of glucose and various proteins. And of course, the brain’s neuron and glial cells have unique cellular and chemical structures as well.

      http://www.iscid.org/encyclopedia/Chemicals_in_the_Brain

  1. Yes – reliving trauma can create the same physical response and deepen the damage – you are doing the good work to provide a forum for people to move through it. Keep it up. ❤

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